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I know that the job of a moderator is an extremely difficult task. You need an extremely vast amount of knowledge in a field as big as Psychology and Neuroscience. So, I think giving moderators a good amount of slack is necessary. But, I think that the closing of questions is going overboard.

  1. How would erasing memories affect personality?
  2. How to remember distinct keywords?
  3. What are the psychological differences between people with a lot and little sense of humor?
  4. How can there exist people who think that there is such a thing as “free will”?
  5. How hard-wired is our emotion perception?
  6. How to keep yourself concentrated over something?

The above is the last 6 closed questions. Below, I'll describe how they are relevant to Psychology.

  1. The erasing of memories is a currently debated topic in psychology as a method of overcoming depression. I guess the more appropriate word is the repression of memories but the writer meant the same thing. Many experts in the field believe this once supported method is actually something that is harmful to depression and it's something that shouldn't be suggested. I don't know why and it would be nice if someone explained it.
  2. How to memorize distinct words? This is not some trite question. There is actually a bit of research on this topic because it involves learning and memory. For example, the best way to learn a fact is to teach it to yourself on day 1. Then, day 3, day 7, day 15, day 30, day 60... This has been researched as the best schedule to use to harden the myelin that creates memories. (I might be off on the actual day numbers but it'll be pretty close.) Then, there are techniques directly related to the physiology of memory creation. Research has shown that a drastic increase in blood pressure or heart rate, repetition, etc. increases the thickness of the myelin. This aligns with evolution because if something dangerous happens, of course, our heart rate will race and our blood pressure will shoot up. We will never forget it or do it again. I can think of several more memory techniques that deal intimately with serious psychology.
  3. The psychological difference between a lot and little sense of humor? That's a huge topic. People with little sense of humor has been found to be more reserved and introverted. They also have been found to identify with minorities and the disenfranchised more. It also has a big impact on possible depression. I would think this is an important question related to psychology.
  4. Free Will. Ok. I agree that this is probably not a pertinent topic here but at least explain to the kid that it's more a physics question because so and so. It's actually a very important question (not within Philosophy) but in Quantum Physics.
  5. Emotions. This is also a heavily researched topic. It's not one that I'm all too familiar with. I do know small things that babies are hard-wired to interpret facial expression (I think, I can't remember). The reason why older games with characters do not work is that they lacked facial expressions. It's actually the biggest part of social interaction and we didn't know about it. Games tried to use realistic actor voices, realistic sounds, and storylines but they didn't work. They spent a lot of money on an animation movie a few years ago and it bombed and they didn't understand why. Now we know. It was the lack of facial expressions and it makes movies real. So, games have made it a mission to include a lot of facial expressions that are accurate. And, it's worked.
  6. Keeping Concentration. This is called grit and it's a field of psychology that is being pioneered by Angela Duckworth at UPenn. The first thing the person should do is get a lot of sleep. There is no such thing as sleeping too much. Many parents say that kids sleep too much when they sleep in. That's not true. They simply slept late and are making it up. This applies to everyone. You literally cannot sleep too much. Your body will wake up and will want to stand up. And, that is how you know you slept enough. When you wake up, you immediately want to stand up. If you feel drowsy, you should go back to sleep and get some more. So, when you study, there is no way to be drowsy. Then, the person will have to tackle the desire to do something else. And, that is where grit comes in. Research is currently being done at this minute on figuring out if you can increase grit or not. (Actually, psychology is such a new field that almost everything is something new and unexplored.)

So, why are these questions being closed when they are so relevant to psychology? And, relevant to psychology that is also featured in mainstream debates? I do think the questions might be too easy but there aren't any answers for the same questions in any past threads. I actually started visiting this site recently because someone suggested that this site would be filled with more mature, knowledgeable people but I haven't really seen evidence of that. But, perhaps, there would be if they were allowed to answer these types of questions and earn badges if possible. (I don't know how to get a badge.)

What do you guys (everyone, including the moderators) think?

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    Please link to the questions. I doubt many of them were closed because of not being relevant to psychology. They were probably closed for being opinion-based or too broad - check each question for its specific close reason. – Arnon Weinberg May 15 at 18:05
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    I found the format of this really long and hard to read, along with no links to the original questions. I suspect they've been closed not necessarily for the reasons you are arguing with. – Bryan Krause May 15 at 18:06
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    @Arnon Beat me by 8 seconds ;) – Bryan Krause May 15 at 18:06
  • Link to questions? Just look at the list of questions that were posed in the Psychology Stack Exchange. Those were the last 6 closed questions. And, the reasons for closure was not satisfactory for me. – John Greer May 15 at 18:52
  • psychology.stackexchange.com/questions Here you go. I just provided you a link to a list of the most recent questions asked. How can both of you just assume that they were closed for valid reasons and just assume that I am in the wrong? Why the bias? – John Greer May 15 at 18:55
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    @JohnGreer Meta questions should have more longevity than that. It'll be obsolete in a few days when there are new questions and be harder to find. People shouldn't have to do more work to understand the questions you ask, whether on the main site or meta. If you won't even put in the effort to add links, why should someone put in the effort to answer it? If you don't care enough to add links, why ask the question in the first place? – Bryan Krause May 15 at 20:53
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Short answer: none of the questions you link to were closed because they are not "relevant to Psychology".

Below you can find the close reason for each of the questions you mention, and a link to an explanation why such questions are not allowed on this site:

  1. How would erasing memories affect personality?
  2. How to remember distinct keywords?
    • This question is off-topic: self help
    • mod-closed by me
  3. What are the psychological differences between people with a lot and little sense of humor?
  4. How can there exist people who think that there is such a thing as “free will”?
  5. How hard-wired is our emotion perception?
  6. How to keep yourself concentrated over something?
    • This question is off-topic: self help
    • mod-closed by me

If you want to argue why these questions should have remained open or should be reopened, please clarify either:

  • why you believe the specified close reason does not apply
  • or, why the close reason should not be there in the first place

Arguing why the questions are relevant is a straw man argument. Like you, we want this site to be "filled with more mature, knowledgeable people". The way to get there, adopting the Stack Exchange model, is disallowing certain types of questions which discourage these types of people from sticking around on the site. Fundamentally, that is why these questions were closed. They might be relevant, but they were not formulated well-enough to be given, or warrant, a suitable answer.

P.s.: Coincidentally, us moderators don't necessarily need "an extremely vast amount of knowledge in a field as big as Psychology and Neuroscience". And, I know I don't have that knowledge! Luckily, you don't need to be an expert in a particular field to identify the clarity of questions and enforce more general community guidelines of Stack Exchange. Wherever I am uncertain due to a lack of knowledge, I let the experts on this site cast their close votes.

P.s.s.: I do apply the mod-hammer more frequently for self-help questions, given that these have been recognized as highly problematic by the community over the course of many years.

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    More specifically, if you would like to see a question reopened, then edit it to comply with the forum rules, add a comment explaining why it should be reopened, and click the "reopen" link to submit a reopen vote for the community to reconsider. The community will then vote on whether or not they agree with you. – Arnon Weinberg May 15 at 23:11
  • Luckily, you don't need to be an expert in a particular field to identify the clarity of questions – I would argue that if you aren't an "expert" in the field (as in "already read an introductory textbook in the field"), then you cannot judge the clarity of the question. (Related: Emphasizing OP's lack of background when they ask unclear questions?). – Ooker Jun 9 at 16:29

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